An investigation of pressure profiles and wearer comfort during walking with a transtibial hydrocast socket

Laing, S, Lythgo, N, Lavranos, J and Lee, P 2019, 'An investigation of pressure profiles and wearer comfort during walking with a transtibial hydrocast socket', American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 98, no. 3, pp. 199-206.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title An investigation of pressure profiles and wearer comfort during walking with a transtibial hydrocast socket
Author(s) Laing, S
Lythgo, N
Lavranos, J
Lee, P
Year 2019
Journal name American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume number 98
Issue number 3
Start page 199
End page 206
Total pages 8
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Abstract Objective: to conduct an investigation of the transtibial hydrocast socket interface pressures during walking and explore potential relationships between pressures experienced and resultant wearer comfort. Design: In this cross-sectional study, pressure data at the limb and hydrocast socket interface during walking were collected from sixteen users of the hydrocast socket. The pressures at this interface were described by location, magnitude and duration for all participants and were compared between the most and least comfortable participants. Results: High pressures were found about the bony prominences of the residual limb, especially the tibial crest of the anterior distal region. Factors identified as potentially causing discomfort (p<0.1, d>0.80) were high peak pressures at the anterior proximal region, and longer durations of submaximal loading at the lateral proximal region and the anterior and medial distal regions. High pressure variability at the anterior proximal region may also contribute to discomfort (p=0.106, d=0.88). Conclusions: The hydrocast socket interface pressures have been described for a cohort of users. A number of differences were found in the pressure profiles of the most and least comfortable participants. These differences suggest trends between the identified pressure parameters and resultant wearer comfort. Future studies should confirm these exploratory results.
Subject Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
Biomechanics
Keyword(s) hydrocasting
transtibial amputation
prosthetic socket
pressure
PCAST
DOI - identifier 10.1097/PHM.0000000000001043
Copyright notice © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN 0894-9115
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 8 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 23 May 2019, 08:44:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us