First-year undergraduate business students' choice of different sources of learning support for assumed math skills

Gleeson, A, Fisher, G, Dianati, S and Smale, N 2019, 'First-year undergraduate business students' choice of different sources of learning support for assumed math skills', Cogent Education, vol. 6, no. 1616654, pp. 1-18.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title First-year undergraduate business students' choice of different sources of learning support for assumed math skills
Author(s) Gleeson, A
Fisher, G
Dianati, S
Smale, N
Year 2019
Journal name Cogent Education
Volume number 6
Issue number 1616654
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Cogent OA
Abstract This paper explores the choice of math skills learning support by an undergraduate student cohort of Commerce and Business students at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. A survey methodology was used to determine the support students sought for the assumed math skills for a mandatory first-year microeconomics subject. The majority of respondents (71%; 120 of n = 169) sought support outside of class for their math skills during the semester. The major source of support was from informal networks of friends and family (62% of respondents), with 40% of respondents seeking help from only this source. University support services from the centrally provided learning center and individual tutoring at course and subject level, were used by 31.4% of respondents, with a minority (8.9%) of respondents utilizing only University support. Students who only used their informal networks for math learning support were more likely to have a recent high school graduate profile, and students using university learning support services were more likely to fit a more diverse entry pathway profile. Recommendations for math skills support include the communication of assumed skills
Subject Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
Economics, Business and Management Curriculum and Pedagogy
Keyword(s) assumed skills
math skills
learning support services
academic skills support
support-seeking behavior
help seeking behaviour
DOI - identifier 10.1080/2331186X.2019.1616654
Copyright notice © 2019 The Author(s).
ISSN 2331-186X
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