Chiropractic spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy for subacute mechanical low back pain: A case series

Kimpton, A, D'Antonio, L, Bishop, J, Mannes, T, Mihailidis, H, Potter, M and Niemiec, D 2008, 'Chiropractic spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy for subacute mechanical low back pain: A case series', Chiropractic Journal of Australia, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 104-110.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Chiropractic spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy for subacute mechanical low back pain: A case series
Author(s) Kimpton, A
D'Antonio, L
Bishop, J
Mannes, T
Mihailidis, H
Potter, M
Niemiec, D
Year 2008
Journal name Chiropractic Journal of Australia
Volume number 38
Issue number 3
Start page 104
End page 110
Total pages 7
Publisher Chiropractors Association of Australia
Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of senior students within a chiropractic educational setting to apply a scholarly approach to identifying and describing myofascial trigger points and mechanical low back pain. Clinical features: 6 patients with a median age of 21 years consulted the RMIT University chiropractic teaching clinics with uncomplicated subacute mechanical low back pain and were treated with spinal manipulation and trigger point therapy. Intervention and Outcomes: All cases were assessed for change in the prevalence of trigger points by the Specified Myofascial Trigger Point Count (SMTPC). Low back pain and functional disability were evaluated using the Modified Oswestry Questionnaire, Quadruple Visual Analogue Scale (QVAS) and the Modified-Modified Schober¿s Technique. Monitoring was completed prior to commencement of therapy and after 6 treatments provided on a weekly basis. Spinal manipulative therapy included high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic adjustments to areas of joint dysfunction and myofascial trigger point therapy in the form of static digital compression. For the majority of the cases there was improvement in pain and the level of disability, lumbar spine flexibility and reduction in the number of myofascial trigger points. Conclusion: It would appear from this case series that in the context of a chiropractic educational setting senior students are able to apply a scholarly approach to identifying and describing myofascial trigger points and mechanical low back pain. Supporting this statement are the principle findings of the observed changes in the outcome measures utilised and myofascial trigger points examined.
Subject Chiropractic
Keyword(s) Chiropractic
manipulation
myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome
outcome and process assessment
education
ISSN 1036-0913
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