Exploring the influences of the development and implementation of speech-enabled software on the injury management business processes in an elite sporting club

Hanisch, B 2009, Exploring the influences of the development and implementation of speech-enabled software on the injury management business processes in an elite sporting club, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Business Information Technology, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
Hanisch.pdf Thesis application/pdf 1.74MB
Title Exploring the influences of the development and implementation of speech-enabled software on the injury management business processes in an elite sporting club
Author(s) Hanisch, B
Year 2009
Abstract Spoken language human computer interfaces are prone to very poor speech recognition accuracy, and the productivity gains that businesses have sought by implementing such interfaces have proven difficult to achieve. An elite sporting club (ESC) which employed a system with poor speech recognition accuracy established a systems development project seeking improvements to the accuracy with the specific aim to significantly gain efficiencies in the capture of elite athlete injury data. This research seeks to understand how an improved speech-enabled application (ISEA) applies spoken language technology to capture elite athlete injury data, thereby obtaining a holistic and in-depth understanding of the influences of ISEA on the injury management process operating at the ESC.

The research was conducted in an organisational setting of one elite sporting club across two strands of enquiry: 1) spoken language human computer interfaces, and 2) injury management with a specific emphasis on its application in elite sports. From existing theory, a conceptual framework was developed providing an in-depth understanding of the areas of enquiry. This was used as a basis from which to develop and extend theory in the areas of IS; spoken language systems and development; elite athlete injury management; and injury management information systems. From the results of the interpretive study undertaken as part of this research, the conceptual framework was refined.

Key outcomes of this research include 1) the construction of a generic IT architecture model for speech-enabled applications to facilitate the IT design of speech-enabled business systems; and 2) a speech systems development model specifically tailored for spoken language systems development. The speech systems development model is constructed from practice as performed during the development of ISEA and extends the theory associated with iterative/evolutionary systems development lifecycle models.

An unexpected outcome from this research is that the athlete’s performance, and not the injury, is strategic to the ESC and leads to a competitive advantage. Further, the research uncovered that a community of practice supporting athlete performance management is critical to its support of the club’s strategic directions. The research has established that the use of spoken language human computer interfaces, can influence business process activities and lead to unexpected business improvement outcomes. The research highlights that these business improvement outcomes occurred as a direct result of the system’s design and its use within the organisation being tightly integrated. The use of spoken language technology to improve the business process enabled the timely capture of injury data, which facilitated knowledge sharing and therefore increased the value of this information.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Business Information Technology
Keyword(s) Speech-enabled applications
Natural language
Natural language understanding
Speech recognition
Information systems
Injury management
Injury prevention
Athlete performance
Sports information systems
IS competitive advantage
Knowledge transfer
Knowledge sharing
Data capture
HCI
Human computer interaction
Human computer interfaces
Systems development
Spoken language technology
Spoken language understanding.
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 312 Abstract Views, 688 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 26 Nov 2010, 14:39:05 EST
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us