The mine at Baryulgil: Work, knowledge, and asbestos disease

McCulloch, J 2007, 'The mine at Baryulgil: Work, knowledge, and asbestos disease', Labour History, vol. 17, no. 92, pp. 113-128.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The mine at Baryulgil: Work, knowledge, and asbestos disease
Author(s) McCulloch, J
Year 2007
Journal name Labour History
Volume number 17
Issue number 92
Start page 113
End page 128
Total pages 16
Publisher Australian Society for the Study of Labour History
Abstract In the period from 1945 until the mid-1970s Australia was a major consumer of asbestos products. Today Australia has one of the world's highest rates of asbestos disease. Local manufacture was dominated by James Hardie Industries which also operated a small chrysotile or white asbestos mine at Baryulgil in northern New South Wales. James Hardie has always claimed that the working and living conditions of its Aboriginal employees were good. However, internal company correspondence and the testimony of miners suggest 14 otherwise. Hardie's refusal to protect its workers from a known risk contributed to a high level of occupational morbidity and mortality as did ineffective state regulations, the nonunion nature of the Baryulgil workplace and the community's isolation.
Subject Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) health
public policy
Copyright notice © 2007 Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, Inc..
ISSN 0023-6942
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