Voice and silence in the first nuclear war: Wilfred Burchett and Hiroshima

Tanter, R 2005, 'Voice and silence in the first nuclear war: Wilfred Burchett and Hiroshima ', Japan Focus.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Voice and silence in the first nuclear war: Wilfred Burchett and Hiroshima
Author(s) Tanter, R
Year 2005
Journal name Japan Focus
Publisher Japan Focus
Abstract [article extract] Wilfred Burchett entered Hiroshima alone in the early hours of 3 September 1945, less than a month after the first nuclear war began with the bombing of the city. Burchett was the first Western journalist - and almost certainly the first Westerner other than prisoners of war - to reach Hiroshima after the bomb. The story which he typed out on his battered Baby Hermes typewriter, sitting among the ruins, remains one of the most important Western eyewitness accounts, and the first attempt to come to terms with the full human and moral consequences of the United States' initiation of nuclear war. For Burchett, that experience was a turning point, 'a watershed in my life, decisively influencing my whole professional career and world outlook'. Subsequently Burchett came to understand that his honest and accurate account of the radiological effects of nuclear weapons not only initiated an animus against him from the highest quarters of the US government, but also marked the beginning of the nuclear victor's determination rigidly to control and censor the picture of Hiroshima and Nagasaki presented to the world.
Subject International Relations
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ISSN 1557-4660
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