Dendritic cells induce immunity and long-lasting protection against blood-stage malaria despite an in vitro parasite-induced maturation defect

Pouniotis, D, Proudfoot, O, Bogdanoska, V, Fifis, T, Plebanski, M and Apostolopoulos, V 2004, 'Dendritic cells induce immunity and long-lasting protection against blood-stage malaria despite an in vitro parasite-induced maturation defect', Infection and Immunity, vol. 72, no. 9, pp. 5331-5339.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Dendritic cells induce immunity and long-lasting protection against blood-stage malaria despite an in vitro parasite-induced maturation defect
Author(s) Pouniotis, D
Proudfoot, O
Bogdanoska, V
Fifis, T
Plebanski, M
Apostolopoulos, V
Year 2004
Journal name Infection and Immunity
Volume number 72
Issue number 9
Start page 5331
End page 5339
Total pages 9
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Abstract Dendritic cells (DC) suffer a maturation defect following interaction with erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites and become unable to induce protective malaria liver-stage immunity. Here we show that, by contrast, maturation-arrested DC in vitro are capable of the successful induction of antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-?) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) T-cell responses, antibody responses, and potent protection against lethal blood-stage malaria challenge in vivo. Similar results were found with DC pulsed with intact parasitized Plasmodium yoelii or Plasmodium chabaudi erythrocytes. Cross-strain protection was also induced. High levels of protection (80 to 100%) against lethal challenge were evident from 10 days after a single immunization and maintained up to 120 days. Interestingly, correlation studies versus blood-stage protection at different time points suggest that the immune elector mechanisms associated with protection could change over time. Antibody-independent, T-cell- and IL-12-associated protection was observed early after immunization, followed by antibody and IL-4-associated, IFN-?-independent protection in long-term studies. These results indicate that DC, even when clearly susceptible to parasite-induced maturation defect effects in vitro, can be central to the induction of protection against blood-stage malaria in vivo.
Subject Microbiology not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1128/IAI.72.9.5331-5339.2004
ISSN 0019-9567
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