Complementarity bundles of products and services on the internet: value perceptions and behavioural intentions

Choochinprakarn, N 2008, Complementarity bundles of products and services on the internet: value perceptions and behavioural intentions, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Business Information Technology, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

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Title Complementarity bundles of products and services on the internet: value perceptions and behavioural intentions
Author(s) Choochinprakarn, N
Year 2008
Abstract This study examines the relationship of complementary products and services offered by B2C e-business operators to customers’ perceived value and evaluates the influence of this perceived value on future customer behaviour. This study employed a 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 between-subjects factorial design. Four independent variables—(1) Product Component, (2) Product Range, (3) Online Service, and (4) Offline Service—were used in order to test the hypotheses derived from the existing literature. A website-based experiment was developed and built to test the relationships. Sixteen travel websites were created to closely mimic the design of real travel websites. The experiment was conducted using a website developed to enable a travel scenario to Phuket, Thailand. Two hundred and seventy-two subjects participated in the experimental use of a travel-focused website to test the role of complementary goods and services. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, univariate analysis of variance and regression analysis.

The results of the experiment using online travel products and services offerings showed two main effects for product range and online service on customer perceived value. Subjects who were exposed to those websites that offered wide product ranges exhibited higher value perceptions than subjects who were exposed to the websites with narrow product ranges. Also, subjects who were exposed to the websites with a greater number of online services exhibited greater perceived value than subjects who were exposed to the websites with limited online services. Moreover, the study indicated a three-factor interaction effect among product component, online services and offline services on customers’ perceived value. The study found that the relationship between the product range and online service on the overall customers’ value was stronger when a greater level of offline service was presented. Additionally, a positive relationship between customers’ perceived value and their future behaviours was found. Subjects who placed a high value on complementary products and services offered by e-business operators had an increased likelihood of displaying favourable behaviours and intentions toward the e-business operators in future.

The data suggest that offline service complementarities can be used to help enhance customers’ perceived value of product range and online service offerings. B2C e-business operators should recognise the importance of offering a bundle of these complementary products and services when conducting their business. The interaction provides more significant insights into the true relationship among these factors on customers’ perceived value rather than considering one factor at a time. Furthermore, customers’ perceived value can be used to explain future behavioural intentions toward e-business operators. The interviews also revealed the importance of complementary products and services when shopping for travel products online as well as other factors, such as company brand name, price, and ease-of-use. This study adds valuable empirical findings to the literature by highlighting the role of complementary products and services in business-to-consumer e-business value creation and provides theoretical support for the relationship between customers’ perceived value and behavioural intentions.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Business Information Technology
Keyword(s) complementary products and services
e-business
value creation
customers’ perceived value
behavioural intentions
experimental study
factorial design
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Created: Wed, 22 Dec 2010, 15:54:48 EST by Guy Aron
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