Working time arrangements and recreation: Making time for weekends when working long hours

Brown, K, Bradley, L, Lingard, H, Townsend, K and Ling, S 2010, 'Working time arrangements and recreation: Making time for weekends when working long hours', Australian Bulletin of Labour, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 194-213.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Working time arrangements and recreation: Making time for weekends when working long hours
Author(s) Brown, K
Bradley, L
Lingard, H
Townsend, K
Ling, S
Year 2010
Journal name Australian Bulletin of Labour
Volume number 36
Issue number 2
Start page 194
End page 213
Total pages 20
Publisher National Institute of Labour Studies Inc.
Abstract Work time spread across the entire week, rather than the conventional five day working week, has meant that workers are now less able to utilise longer stretches of recreation time especially in gaining access to a full two-day break over a weekend. This paper explores the issues contributing to workers' acquisition of longer recreation time. It seeks to determine the effects of this acquisition on the quality of working and non-working time for the employee through a study of work-life balance in the construction industry. It finds that weekends are more important to achieving work-life balance than shorter days over a six-day week when working long hours. Further, 'personal time' is a key element in achieving satisfactory work-life balance for employees, and this type of 'time' is often forgone in trying to integrate the necessary and desired non-work activities in the shorter time available to workers.
Subject Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Keyword(s) flexible work arrangements
Work-life balance
hours of labour
time management
quality of work
recreation.
ISSN 03116336
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