Ethical issues in the recruitment and retention of graduate nurses: a national concern

Johnstone, M and Stewart, M 2003, 'Ethical issues in the recruitment and retention of graduate nurses: a national concern', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 240-247.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Ethical issues in the recruitment and retention of graduate nurses: a national concern
Author(s) Johnstone, M
Stewart, M
Year 2003
Journal name Contemporary Nurse
Volume number 14
Issue number 3
Start page 240
End page 247
Total pages 8
Publisher eContent Management
Abstract Australia, like other countries, is facing a crisis in the recruitment and retention of nurses. Adding to this crisis is the insufficient supply of new graduate nurses to meet current and future workforce demands. Unless changes are implemented that will bring likely demand and supply into balance, it is predicted that by the year 2010 (just seven years away) there will be a shortage of 40,000 nurses in Australia. Significantly, the current shortage of nurses is seeing hospitals, regions, States and countries compete fiercely with each other as they strive to recruit and retain sufficient numbers of nurses to meet their work force needs. The recruitment and retention strategies used by some prospective employers, however, have been highly questionable and raise serious questions about the ethics of nurse recruitment. In response to the issues raised, it is a key recommendation of this paper that mechanisms, including a national code of practice, need urgently to be put in place to ensure the effective, equitable and ethical regulation and monitoring of nurse recruitment and retention in Australia.
ISSN 1037-6178
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