Physical and Psychosocial Effects of Wii Video Game Use among Older Women

Wollersheim, D, Merkes, M, Shields, N, Liamputtong, P, Wallis, L, Reynolds, F and Koh, L 2010, 'Physical and Psychosocial Effects of Wii Video Game Use among Older Women', International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 85-98.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Physical and Psychosocial Effects of Wii Video Game Use among Older Women
Author(s) Wollersheim, D
Merkes, M
Shields, N
Liamputtong, P
Wallis, L
Reynolds, F
Koh, L
Year 2010
Journal name International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 85
End page 98
Total pages 14
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Life & Social Sciences
Abstract This study investigated the physical and psychosocial effect of exergaming in community dwelling older adult women. In a pilot study consisting of a six-week baseline period and a six-week intervention period, participants (N = 11, mean age = 73.5 years, SD = 9.0) played Nintendo Wii Sports twice weekly. We measured full body movements using accelerometers, and assessed psychosocial effects through end-of-study focus group meetings. There were large self-reported psychological effects related to positive changes in self perception. The game-play deepened social connections within the group and provided a basis for shared experiences with younger aged family members. Physically, the game-play showed significantly higher maximum energy expenditure (t = -4.52, p < 0.05) than baseline, but no significant difference in overall energy expenditure. Findings from the quantitative data showed that Wii-play did not have substantial physical effects; nevertheless, qualitative data revealed that the participants perceived an improved sense of physical, social and psychological wellbeing.
Subject Health Promotion
Keyword(s) Wii
Older Women
Psychosocial Benefit
Australia
Exercise
Exergames
Copyright notice © International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society 2010
ISSN 1835-8780
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