Highly permeable, anti-bacterial, gas selective membranes for the measurement of intra-ruminant gas production

Berean, K 2015, Highly permeable, anti-bacterial, gas selective membranes for the measurement of intra-ruminant gas production, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

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Title Highly permeable, anti-bacterial, gas selective membranes for the measurement of intra-ruminant gas production
Author(s) Berean, K
Year 2015
Abstract In the recent past, researchers have turned to advancements in membrane technology for gas separation to help solve the enormous challenges faced by society in regards to limited resources and environmental sustainability. Compared with conventional gas separation methods, membrane technology is environmentally benign and energy-efficient. Furthermore, membranes require less space and can be operated in a continuous mode at low cost. Ideal membrane attributes include high permeate flux, high gas selectivity and operational longevity.

The aim of this PhD project is to synthesise, optimise, characterise and evaluate the gas permeation properties of polymdimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanocomposites and finally to prolong their lifetime through the addition of antimicrobial properties. The author of this thesis thoroughly reviewed the fundamental properties and synthesis methods for gas permeable nanocomposite membranes. Based on the literature, the author recognised the lack in a standardised synthesis condition for the chosen base polymer PDMS. Additionally the author identified the significant enhancements that two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials had over other standard fillers when engineering the composites properties, due to an increased surface to volume ratio. Finally, in order to prolong the lifetime of membranes operating in aqueous or humid environments, bacterial growth needs to be controlled. The author explores novel experimental techniques to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of the developed material.

Overall, the author strongly believes that the objectives achieved in this PhD research work, have contributed significantly to the advancement of gas separating membranes, antimicrobial materials and in vivo experimental techniques regarding the investigation of microbial growth onto materials, thus creating new systems and adding significantly to the knowledge of the field.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Electrical and Computer Engineering
Subjects Nanomaterials
Keyword(s) Gas Separation
Membranes
2D Materials
Antibacterial Materials
nanocomposites
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Created: Tue, 29 Sep 2015, 12:58:08 EST by Keely Chapman
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