Using PRS to enhance student learning process: The application of revised study process questionnaire-2 factors

Pui, O, Sriratanaviriyakul, N, Wei, W, Then, P and Tho, Z 2013, 'Using PRS to enhance student learning process: The application of revised study process questionnaire-2 factors', in Dr John Blooma, Dr Mathews Nkhoma, Dr Nelson Leung (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Information Systems Management and Evaluation, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 13-14 May 2013, pp. 206-214.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Using PRS to enhance student learning process: The application of revised study process questionnaire-2 factors
Author(s) Pui, O
Sriratanaviriyakul, N
Wei, W
Then, P
Tho, Z
Year 2013
Conference name ICIME 2013
Conference location Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Conference dates 13-14 May 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Information Systems Management and Evaluation
Editor(s) Dr John Blooma, Dr Mathews Nkhoma, Dr Nelson Leung
Publisher Academic Conferences and Publishing International
Place of publication Reading, United Kingdom
Start page 206
End page 214
Total pages 9
Abstract Based on Biggs et.al (2001), this study investigated the extent of how Personal Response Systems (PRS) can influence students' learning experiences in an undergraduate classroom for deep and surface learning. The experiment involved 40 students in Bachelor of Design (Multimedia Systems) at RMIT University Vietnam. The topic presented was Colour Theory. 99% of the participants were local students who used English as second language. The Study Process Questionnaire circulated during PRS sessions were used to inquire into student motives and strategies in achieving their learning outcomes. Factor analysis identified 4 underlying factors: Deep Motive, Surface Motive, Deep Strategy and Surface Strategy. The quantitative analysis suggested that there was a positive relationship between Deep Approach (DA) and Surface Approach (SA) with the four subscales, Deep Motive (DM), Deep Strategy (DS), Surface Motive (SM), and Surface Strategy (SS). In other words, PRS appears to enhance, improve and facilitate students' learning process by promoting deep motives and strategies. This finding was further validated with data gathered from focus group interviews. 10 participants had been invited to participate in focus group interviews. The prompts of the semistructured interview include PRS classroom experience, motives of using PRS and the strategies of using PRS in classroom. Special attention had been given attention to the analysis of the student's role, lecturer's role and the interaction between them. The findings from the interviews supported the quantitative analysis and suggested that the traditionally perceived teacher roles, learner roles and the interactions between teachers and learners in the classroom had been transformed tremendously when PRS was used as a teaching pedagogy. (cont.)
Subjects Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Keyword(s) Clicker
learning process
learning outcome
active learning
Copyright notice © The Authors, 2013. All Rights Reserved.
ISBN 9781909507180
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