Validity and reliability of dependent variables: Considerations for construction safety researchers

Behm, M, Lingard, H and Bruening, J 2014, 'Validity and reliability of dependent variables: Considerations for construction safety researchers', in R. Aulin, A. Ek (ed.) Proceedings of the CIB W099 Conference, Achieving Sustainable Construction Health and Safety, Lund, Sweden, 2-3 June 2014, pp. 609-617.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Validity and reliability of dependent variables: Considerations for construction safety researchers
Author(s) Behm, M
Lingard, H
Bruening, J
Year 2014
Conference name CIB W099 2014
Conference location Lund, Sweden
Conference dates 2-3 June 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the CIB W099 Conference, Achieving Sustainable Construction Health and Safety
Editor(s) R. Aulin, A. Ek
Publisher Lund University
Place of publication Lund, Sweden
Start page 609
End page 617
Total pages 9
Abstract The issue of underreporting of construction related injuries and illnesses to government agencies and common interest groups has developed into a plague. The aim of this paper is to draw attention to this problem and offer recommendations for construction researchers. How do we know if interventions are effective if we use insensitive and unreliable measurements as dependent variables? How do we know what works, what does not, and what is most effective at reducing risk and enhancing safety? How can we compare across countries, companies, or trades? Descriptive and intervention research requires both valid and reliable measurements. Construction safety and health research, like all occupational safety and health research, relies heavily on lagging indicators such as injury and illness rates as dependent variables and descriptors. For quite some time, the validity and reliability of injury and illness statistics has been called into question. Poorly developed and managed incentive programs and the desire to look good have caused injury and illness rates to plummet, whereas fatality rates have not experienced the same reduction. However, the effect of this phenomenon on researchers has not been given sufficient attention. Through a review of literature and research methodology guidance we evaluate the use of lagging indicators as dependent variables in construction safety and health research. The practical implications will provide for a debate amongst conference participants and readers. The social implications are wide as we will reveal the professional and ethical implications for practitioners and researchers.
Subjects Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Keyword(s) injury statistics
measurement
reliability
underreporting
validity.
Copyright notice ©
ISBN 9789176230053
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 185 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 05 Nov 2014, 07:56:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us