Using a projective technique to explore consumer awareness and healthy practices

Cherrier, H 2010, 'Using a projective technique to explore consumer awareness and healthy practices', in R. Russell-Bennett and S. Rundle-Thiele (ed.) Proceedings of the 2010 International NonProfit and Social Marketing Conference, Brisbane, Australia, 15-16 July 2010, pp. 49-52.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Using a projective technique to explore consumer awareness and healthy practices
Author(s) Cherrier, H
Year 2010
Conference name INSM 2010
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 15-16 July 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2010 International NonProfit and Social Marketing Conference
Editor(s) R. Russell-Bennett and S. Rundle-Thiele
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Australia
Start page 49
End page 52
Total pages 4
Abstract Social marketing campaigns often concentrates on risk awareness to implement social change. For example, several healthcare institutions promote breast and cervical cancer screenings by informing consumers on the dreadful consequences associated with cancer (Talbert 2008). Similarly, combating drug or alcohol consumption often leads health organizations to use mass media educational programs to inform on the negative effects of drugs and alcohol on individuals' mental stability and health. The prominence of risk awareness campaigns is evident in the diffusion of "smoking kills" or "smoking is bad of your health" warnings on cigarette packaging. The main principle is to mass publicize the negative consequences of consuming the wrong products (i.e.: drugs, alcohol, cigarettes). Here, the consumer is understood as a rational individual who makes choices to fulfill his/her utilitarian needs; and the role of health institutions is to educate on how to make the good choice and avoid the risks of making the wrong choices. Although making healthy choices can fulfill utilitarian needs, it is questionable as to whether healthy practices result from a purely rational, informed and individualistic decision making process. As Bauman notes, individual choices, including making healthy choices, are contingent, not only education and availability, but also on the social rules and codes within society (Bauman 1995). Along with Bauman, this research considered health as a marker of identity and questions whether consumer awareness on the good versus bad consumption practices leads to healthy behavior.
Subjects Marketing not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice © Queensland University of Technology
ISBN 9781741073201
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