Associations with asymptomatic colonization with candida in women reporting past vaginal candidiasis: An observational study

Watson, C, Fairley, C, Grando, D, Garland, S, Myers, S and Pirotta, M 2013, 'Associations with asymptomatic colonization with candida in women reporting past vaginal candidiasis: An observational study', European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, vol. 169, no. 2, pp. 376-379.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Associations with asymptomatic colonization with candida in women reporting past vaginal candidiasis: An observational study
Author(s) Watson, C
Fairley, C
Grando, D
Garland, S
Myers, S
Pirotta, M
Year 2013
Journal name European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume number 169
Issue number 2
Start page 376
End page 379
Total pages 4
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Abstract Objective: Asymptomatic vaginal colonization with Candida species is a known risk factor for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Taking known risk factors for symptomatic VVC, the authors sought to identify factors associated with asymptomatic colonization. Study design: Aspart of a randomizedcontrolledtrial whichcomparedvaginal candidal colony counts in women taking garlic tablets or placebo, 192 asymptomatic women collected a baseline screening swab for Candida species. Eligibility for this study included at least one self-reported episode of VVC in the previous 12 months and age 18-50 years. Known risk factors for VVC were compared in women colonized with candida and those without colonization. Results: 37%of asymptomatic women who self-reportedVVC in the previous 12months were colonized with vaginal Candida species. Using multivariate analysis, two factors were associated with asymptomatic colonization: a current sexual partner (P = 0.02) and being born outside of Australia (P = 0.05). Use of oral contraceptives was not statistically significant (P = 0.27). Conclusions: Clinical relevance of asymptomatic colonization with vaginal yeast and its link to episodes of VVC warrants further investigation.
Subject Infectious Agents
Mycology
Infectious Diseases
Keyword(s) Candida vulvovaginal garlic
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2013.03.030
Copyright notice © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN 0301-2115
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