Assimilation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from microplastics by the marine amphipod, allorchestes compressa

Chua, M, Shimeta, J, Nugegoda, D, Morrison, P and Clarke, B 2014, 'Assimilation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from microplastics by the marine amphipod, allorchestes compressa', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 48, no. 14, pp. 8127-8134.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Assimilation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from microplastics by the marine amphipod, allorchestes compressa
Author(s) Chua, M
Shimeta, J
Nugegoda, D
Morrison, P
Clarke, B
Year 2014
Journal name Environmental Science and Technology
Volume number 48
Issue number 14
Start page 8127
End page 8134
Total pages 8
Publisher American Chemical Society
Abstract Microplastic particles (MPPs; <5 mm) are found in skin cleansing soaps and are released into the environment via the sewage system. MPPs in the environment can sorb persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that can potentially be assimilated by organisms mistaking MPPs for food. Amphipods (Allorchestes compressa) exposed to MPPs isolated from a commercial facial cleansing soap ingested ≤45 particles per animal and evacuated them within 36 h. Amphipods were exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, and -183) in the presence or absence of MPPs. This study has demonstrated that PBDEs derived from MPPs can be assimilated into the tissue of a marine amphipod. MPPs reduced PBDE uptake compared to controls, but they caused greater proportional uptake of higher-brominated congeners such as BDE-154 and -153 compared to BDE-28 and -47. While MPPs in the environment may lower PBDE uptake compared to unabsorbed free chemicals, our study has demonstrated they can transfer PBDEs into a marine organism. Therefore, MPPs pose a risk of contaminating aquatic food chains with the potential for increasing public exposure through dietary sources. This study has demonstrated that MPPs can act as a vector for the assimilation of POPs into marine organisms.
Subject Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Brominated Flame Retardants
Persistent Organic Pollutants
Plastic Scrubbers
North Pacific
Human-Milk
Environment
Ingestion
Debris
Pbdes
Australia
DOI - identifier 10.1021/es405717z
Copyright notice © 2014 American Chemical Society
ISSN 0013-936X
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 151 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 73 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 256 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 20 Jan 2015, 08:31:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us