Assessment of the viability of vegetable oil fuels - species, land, social, environmental, population and safety considerations

Thomas, I, Porter, N and Lappas, P 2015, 'Assessment of the viability of vegetable oil fuels - species, land, social, environmental, population and safety considerations', in Ingemar Denbratt, Aleksandar Subic, Jörg Wellnitz (ed.) Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Sustainable Automotive Technologies (ICSAT 2014), Gothenburg, Sweden, 29 September-1 October 2014, pp. 197-215.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Assessment of the viability of vegetable oil fuels - species, land, social, environmental, population and safety considerations
Author(s) Thomas, I
Porter, N
Lappas, P
Year 2015
Conference name ICSAT 2014: Series: Lecture Notes in Mobility
Conference location Gothenburg, Sweden
Conference dates 29 September-1 October 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Sustainable Automotive Technologies (ICSAT 2014)
Editor(s) Ingemar Denbratt, Aleksandar Subic, Jörg Wellnitz
Publisher Springer
Place of publication United States
Start page 197
End page 215
Total pages 19
Abstract This work follows the literature review and on-road trial findings presented at ICSAT 2013 (Thomas et al. Assessment of the viability of vegetable oil based fuels. In: Lecture notes in mobility-sustainable automotive technologies 2013, 2013). In addition, it addresses the availability of non-food oil-producing species and land, the sociological and environmental aspects associated with growing biofuels and the potential increased safety of using vegetable oil fuels and blends. The author claims that it is essentially impossible to provide the world's current energy needs without fossil fuels unless humanity is prepared to control its population to a sustainable level. Production methods and costings are not addressed as intended and will be the subject of further study. Costs of growing, extracting, purifying and transporting vegetable oil fuel are lower than any alternatives given the simplicity of processes involved, the fact that almost anyone can perform them and the fact that the fuel can be grown and processed close to point of use by small, non-monopolistic enterprises. Readers wishing to consider costings are referred to reports by the EC Joint Research Commission and the International Energy Agency (IEA) (Production costs of alternative transportation fuels-influence of crude oil price and technology maturity; International Energy Agency; Jensen, Unmodified vegetable oil as an automotive fuel; the institute for prospective technological studies of the European commission directorate general joint research centre).
Subjects Automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl. Alternative/Renewable Fuels)
DOI - identifier 10.1007/978-3-319-17999-5_19
Copyright notice © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015
ISBN 9783319179988
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