Alcohol ingestion impairs maximal post-exercise rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis following a single bout of concurrent training

Parr, E, Camera, D, Areta, J, Burke, L, Phillips, S, Hawley, J and Coffey, V 2014, 'Alcohol ingestion impairs maximal post-exercise rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis following a single bout of concurrent training', PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 2, e88384, pp. 1-9.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Alcohol ingestion impairs maximal post-exercise rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis following a single bout of concurrent training
Author(s) Parr, E
Camera, D
Areta, J
Burke, L
Phillips, S
Hawley, J
Coffey, V
Year 2014
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Article Number e88384
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Public Library of Science
Abstract Introduction: The culture in many team sports involves consumption of large amounts of alcohol after training/competition. The effect of such a practice on recovery processes underlying protein turnover in human skeletal muscle are unknown. We determined the effect of alcohol intake on rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following strenuous exercise with carbohydrate (CHO) or protein ingestion. Methods: In a randomized cross-over design, 8 physically active males completed three experimental trials comprising resistance exercise (8x5 reps leg extension, 80% 1 repetition maximum) followed by continuous (30 min, 63% peak power output (PPO)) and high intensity interval (10x30 s, 110% PPO) cycling. Immediately, and 4 h post-exercise, subjects consumed either 500 mL of whey protein (25 g; PRO), alcohol (1.5 g·kg body mass-1, 12±2 standard drinks) co-ingested with protein (ALC-PRO), or an energy-matched quantity of carbohydrate also with alcohol (25 g maltodextrin; ALC-CHO). Subjects also consumed a CHO meal (1.5 g CHO·kg body mass -1) 2 h post-exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 2 and 8 h post-exercise. Results: Blood alcohol concentration was elevated above baseline with ALC-CHO and ALC-PRO throughout recovery (P<0.05). Conclusion: We provide novel data demonstrating that alcohol consumption reduces rates of MPS following a bout of concurrent exercise, even when co-ingested with protein. We conclude that alcohol ingestion suppresses the anabolic response in skeletal muscle and may therefore impair recovery and adaptation to training and/or subsequent performance.
Subject Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1371/journal.pone.0088384
Copyright notice © 2014 Parr et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
ISSN 1932-6203
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