Dwelling in the biosphere: Exploring an embodied human-environment connection in resilience thinking

Cooke, B, West, S and Boonstra, W 2016, 'Dwelling in the biosphere: Exploring an embodied human-environment connection in resilience thinking', Sustainability Science, vol. 11, pp. 831-843.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Dwelling in the biosphere: Exploring an embodied human-environment connection in resilience thinking
Author(s) Cooke, B
West, S
Boonstra, W
Year 2016
Journal name Sustainability Science
Volume number 11
Start page 831
End page 843
Total pages 13
Publisher Springer
Abstract Resilience has emerged as a prominent paradigm for interpreting and shaping human-environment connections in the context of global environmental change. Resilience emphasizes dynamic spatial and temporal change in social-ecological systems where humans are inextricably interwoven with the environment. While influential, resilience thinking has been critiqued for an under-theorized framing of socio-cultural dynamics. In this paper, we examine how the resilience concepts of planetary boundaries and reconnecting to the biosphere frame human-environment connection in terms of mental representations and biophysical realities. We argue that focusing solely on mental reconnection limits further integration between the social and the ecological, thus countering a foundational commitment in resilience thinking to social-ecological interconnectedness. To address this susceptibility we use Tim Ingold's 'dwelling perspective' to outline an embodied form of human-environment (re)connection. Through dwelling, connections are not solely produced in the mind, but through the ongoing interactivity of mind, body and environment through time. Using this perspective, we position the biosphere as an assemblage that is constantly in the making through the active cohabitation of humans and nonhumans. To illustrate insights that may emerge from this perspective we bring an embodied connection to earth stewardship, given its growing popularity for forging local to global sustainability transformations.
Subject Environmental Management
Social and Cultural Geography
DOI - identifier 10.1007/s11625-016-0367-3
Copyright notice © Springer Japan 2016
ISSN 1862-4065
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