Can the neighborhood built environment make a difference in children's development? Building the research agenda to create evidence for place-based children's policy

Villanueva, K, Badland, H, Kvalsvig, A, O'Connor, M, Christian, H, Woolcock, G, Giles-Corti, B and Goldfeld, S 2016, 'Can the neighborhood built environment make a difference in children's development? Building the research agenda to create evidence for place-based children's policy', Academic Pediatrics, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 10-19.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Can the neighborhood built environment make a difference in children's development? Building the research agenda to create evidence for place-based children's policy
Author(s) Villanueva, K
Badland, H
Kvalsvig, A
O'Connor, M
Christian, H
Woolcock, G
Giles-Corti, B
Goldfeld, S
Year 2016
Journal name Academic Pediatrics
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Start page 10
End page 19
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Healthy child development is determined by a combination of physical, social, family, individual, and environmental factors. Thus far, the majority of child development research has focused on the influence of individual, family, and school environments and has largely ignored the neighborhood context despite the increasing policy interest. Yet given that neighborhoods are the locations where children spend large periods of time outside of home and school, it is plausible the physical design of neighborhoods (built environment), including access to local amenities, can affect child development. The relatively few studies exploring this relationship support associations between child development and neighborhood destinations, green spaces, interaction with nature, traffic exposure, and housing density. These studies emphasize the need to more deeply understand how child development outcomes might be influenced by the neighborhood built environment. Pursuing this research space is well aligned with the current global movements on livable and child-friendly cities. It has direct public policy impact by informing planning policies across a range of sectors (urban design and planning, transport, public health, and pediatrics) to implement place-based interventions and initiatives that target children's health and development at the community level. We argue for the importance of exploring the effect of the neighborhood built environment on child development as a crucial first step toward informing urban design principles to help reduce developmental vulnerability in children and to set optimal child development trajectories early.
Subject Epidemiology
Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) built environment
child development
neighborhood
physical environment
place-based
policy
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.acap.2015.09.006
Copyright notice © 2016 Elsevier
ISSN 1876-2859
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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