Bridging socio-cultural incongruity: Conceptualising the success of students from low socio-economic status backgrounds in Australian higher education

Devlin, M 2013, 'Bridging socio-cultural incongruity: Conceptualising the success of students from low socio-economic status backgrounds in Australian higher education', Studies in Higher Education, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 939-949.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Bridging socio-cultural incongruity: Conceptualising the success of students from low socio-economic status backgrounds in Australian higher education
Author(s) Devlin, M
Year 2013
Journal name Studies in Higher Education
Volume number 38
Issue number 6
Start page 939
End page 949
Total pages 11
Publisher Routledge
Abstract This article examines the conceptual frames that might be used to consider the success and achievement of students from low socio-economic status in Australian higher education. Based on an examination of key literature from Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and North America, it is argued that Australia should avoid adopting either a deficit conception of students from low socio-economic backgrounds or a deficit conception of the institutions into which they will move. Further, rather than it being the primary responsibility of the student or of the institution to change to ensure the success of these students, it is argued that the adjustments necessary to ensure achievement for students from low socio-economic backgrounds in Australian higher education would be most usefully conceptualised as a 'joint venture' toward bridging socio-cultural incongruity.
Subject Higher Education
Keyword(s) cultural capital
low socio-economic status
socio-cultural incongruity
student success
DOI - identifier 10.1080/03075079.2011.613991
Copyright notice © 2013 Society for Research into Higher Education
ISSN 0307-5079
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