Caring for baby: what sources of information do mothers use and trust?

Dobele, A, Fry, J, Rundle-Thiele, S and Fry, T 2017, 'Caring for baby: what sources of information do mothers use and trust?', Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31, no. 7, pp. 677-689.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Caring for baby: what sources of information do mothers use and trust?
Author(s) Dobele, A
Fry, J
Rundle-Thiele, S
Fry, T
Year 2017
Journal name Journal of Services Marketing
Volume number 31
Issue number 7
Start page 677
End page 689
Total pages 13
Publisher Emeralds Publishing Limited
Abstract Purpose - A broad array of information channels exists for service customers. The purpose of this study is to better understand the relationship between the use of, and trust in, information channels, so that there is scope to increase the effectiveness of reliable information provision and, hence, to change behaviour. Design/methodology/approach - This study empirically explored whether customers use channels they trust, and trust what they use, and examined the association between individual (demographic) factors and that trust. A total of 472 mothers completed an online survey. Findings - The current study empirically explored channel trust and individual factors, finding that individual factors (such as education level) and trust warrant inclusion in traditional communication models such as Communication-Human Information Processing. The findings revealed that the more highly educated a customer is, the more likely it will be that a health professional is their most trusted channel, but the less likely it will be that they consider family the most trusted channel. Magazines are the least trusted information channel. Further, while informants' most trusted information channel was healthcare professionals, this was not the most common information channel used. Research limitations/implications - This study was limited to a female consumer sample focused upon one service (maternity and child health) and five key information channels, which limits the generalizability. Further, the data were collected via an internet survey, which have biased may the results on use and trust of the internet. Practical implications - The findings showcase the importance of demographic factors and the relationship between trust in information sources and use. The insights developed provide a useful research agenda for the future. This study was limited to a female consumer sample focused upon one service (maternity and child health) and five key information channels, which limits the
Subject Marketing Communications
Keyword(s) Healthcare
Information sources
Channel trust
Credence services
Maternal and child health
DOI - identifier 10.1108/JSM-02-2015-0104
Copyright notice © Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN 0887-6045
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