Using immersive 3D computer games to help engage learners and deliver skill sets

O'Rourke, M 2013, 'Using immersive 3D computer games to help engage learners and deliver skill sets', in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference - VET Research At the Edge - Training for Diversity and Change, Fremantle, Australia, 3-5 April 2013, pp. 1-11.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Using immersive 3D computer games to help engage learners and deliver skill sets
Author(s) O'Rourke, M
Year 2013
Conference name AVETRA 2013
Conference location Fremantle, Australia
Conference dates 3-5 April 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference - VET Research At the Edge - Training for Diversity and Change
Publisher AVETRA
Place of publication Australia
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Abstract Games-based training has the potential to improve engagement and skill development in VET. In this study a 3D immersive game environment was developed by aligning performance criteria from the unit CPCCOHS1001A : Work safely in the construction industry with gameplay scenarios. Trials of the White Card Game were undertaken with Certificate 3 in Construction (Carpentry) students who reported a preference for games-based learning compared to traditional delivery methods. They also expressed greater understanding for both the learning content and the relevance to vocational outcomes, even by those who had previously undertaken more conventional OHS training. A design based research methodology was undertaken with the aim of the research being an exploration of alternative pedagogical approaches to improve engagement and knowledge transfer. The customisation of the game environment allowed learners to take on workplace identities, and through virtual work-based situations learning was contextualised and expertise developed through cycles of learning and practice (Yelland 2007). Well designed games can cultivate problem solving skills and understanding through the inherent characteristics of gameplay, which include being pleasantly frustrating, offering safe havens to explore and learn, offering contextualised skill development and supplying information on-demand (Gee, 2007).
Subjects Educational Technology and Computing
ISBN 9780980527537
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