3D-printed chips: Compatibility of additive manufacturing photopolymeric substrata with biological applications

Mitchell, M and Wlodkowic, D 2018, '3D-printed chips: Compatibility of additive manufacturing photopolymeric substrata with biological applications', Micromachines, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1-20.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title 3D-printed chips: Compatibility of additive manufacturing photopolymeric substrata with biological applications
Author(s) Mitchell, M
Wlodkowic, D
Year 2018
Journal name Micromachines
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPIAG
Abstract Additive manufacturing (AM) is ideal for building adaptable, structurally complex, three-dimensional, monolithic lab-on-chip (LOC) devices from only a computer design file. Consequently, it has potential to advance micro- to milllifluidic LOC design, prototyping, and production and further its application in areas of biomedical and biological research. However, its application in these areas has been hampered due to material biocompatibility concerns. In this review, we summarise commonly used AM techniques: vat polymerisation and material jetting. We discuss factors influencing material biocompatibility as well as methods to mitigate material toxicity and thus promote its application in these research fields.
Subject Biomedical Instrumentation
Polymers and Plastics
Fluidisation and Fluid Mechanics
Keyword(s) 3D printing
Additive manufacturing
Bioassay
Lab-on-a-chip
Polymers
Toxicity
DOI - identifier 10.3390/mi9020091
Copyright notice © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
ISSN 2072-666X
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