Avatars and the invisible omniscience: the panoptical model within virtual worlds

Dodds, C 2007, Avatars and the invisible omniscience: the panoptical model within virtual worlds, Masters by Research, Creative Media, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

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Dodds.pdf Exegesis application/pdf 6.04MB
Title Avatars and the invisible omniscience: the panoptical model within virtual worlds
Author(s) Dodds, C
Year 2007
Abstract This Exegesis and accompanying artworks are the culmination of research conducted into the existence of surveillance in virtual worlds. A panoptical model has been used, and its premise tested through the extension into these communal spaces. Issues such as data security, personal and corporate privacy have been investigated, as has the use of art as a propositional mode.

This Exegesis contains existing and new theoretical arguments and observations that have aided the development of research outcomes; a discussion of action research as a methodology; and questionnaire outcomes assisting in understanding player perceptions and concerns.

A series of artworks were completed during the research to aid in understanding the nature of virtual surveillance; as a method to examine outcomes; and as an experiential interface for viewers of the research. The artworks investigate a series of surveillance perspectives including parental gaze, machine surveillance and self-surveillance.

The outcomes include considerations into the influence surveillance has on player behaviour, security issues pertaining to the extension of corporations into virtual worlds, the acceptance of surveillance by virtual communities, and the merits of applying artworks as proposition.
Degree Masters by Research
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Creative Media
Keyword(s) Computer games
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Created: Wed, 16 Feb 2011, 09:28:49 EST by Keely Chapman
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